BaySport Nutrition Tip by Sheri Berger, RDN – Smart Snacks

As preparations for the new school year begins, an important decision is what to pack for lunch. BaySport’s Nutrition Coach, Sheri Berger, RDN (Registered Dietitian/Nutritionist) shares a health tip for the entire family, whether they’re going to school or work.

Choosing SMART SNACKS throughout the day will help to keep you energized, focused, happy, and provide steady blood sugar. Choosing less quality snacks will do the opposite. SMART SNACKS provide fiber, lean protein, quality carbohydrates, healthy fats, and around 150-200 calories. Here are some great choices:

NUT OPTIONS:
• Two tablespoons of all natural peanut butter with 6 celery sticks
• One tablespoon of nut butter with a medium apple, banana, or other fruit
• One tablespoon of nut butter with 8-10 whole grain crackers
• ½ peanut butter sandwich on whole grain bread with apple or banana slices
• 8-10 walnuts or almonds with a medium apple or other fruit

BEAN & LEGUME OPTIONS:
• ¼ cup of beans, 1 tablespoon of cheese, and salsa on a whole grain tortilla
• ½ cup of hummus or black bean dip with cut up vegetables (carrots, celery, mini peppers, cucumber slices, cherry tomatoes, jicama)
• ¼ cup of hummus on whole wheat pita bread
• ½ cup of roasted garbanzo beans with 10 cherry tomatoes

DAIRY & EGGS:
• String cheese or one ounce of other cheese and a piece of fruit
• One cup of plain low-fat yogurt with ground flaxseeds and 3-4 strawberries
• One cup of plain Greek yogurt with two tablespoons granola and one teaspoon agave nectar or honey
• Two tablespoons goat cheese, dill, and tomatoes on a piece of whole grain bread
• ½ cup of cottage cheese with chopped fruit (berries, nectarines, peaches, etc.)
• Once hardboiled egg with a rice cake or whole grain crackers

MEAT & FISH:
• 1/2 can tuna or salmon with 5-8 whole grain crackers
• Three romaine lettuce wraps with nitrate-free cold cuts or other lean meat
• Two ounces smoked salmon on a rice cake or three whole grain crackers
• Six shrimp with cocktail sauce, celery, and carrots
• Two ounces of beef, turkey, or salmon jerky with cucumber slices

 

Learn more about Sheri Berger, RDN:
Sheri Berger is a Registered Dietitian having completed her B.S. in Food/Nutrition & Dietetics and a dietetic internship at Loyola University Chicago. Sheri has a diverse professional background that includes hospital and outpatient clinic support, preventative wellness programs, corporate wellness services, cardiovascular disease management, and working with seniors. Sheri enjoys engaging her clients in pursuit of their personal wellness goals and leading by example with her healthy lifestyle. Sheri has been certified in adult weight management since 2005. She belongs to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, California Dietetics Association, and the San Jose Peninsula District of the CDA. Sheri enjoys spending her free time with her husband and two daughters and she loves to run marathons.

The Mediterranean Diet, Should It Be Followed?

By Sheri Berger, RDN

The Mediterranean Diet is a diet and lifestyle plan that is based on the habits of people who live in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. It is well known that people who live in this region live longer and have a lower chance of developing cancer and cardiovascular abnormalities than Americans. The plan promotes an active lifestyle, weight control, and a diet low in saturated fat, animal protein, and sugar and rich in produce, nuts, olive oil, and other healthy foods.

Here are the pros of the Mediterranean diet:

– The diet emphasizes eating fruits, veggies, whole grains, beans, nuts, legumes, olive oil, and flavorful herbs and spices; fish and seafood at least a couple of times a week; and poultry, eggs, cheese and yogurt in moderation, while saving sweets and red meat for special occasions. This means you are consuming a diet rich in whole foods, fiber, healthy fats, vitamins and minerals and low in saturated fat and added sugar.

Pros of the Mediterranean diet:
– The diet does not promote skipping any food groups; foods that are higher in sugar or saturated fat are encouraged to be eaten in moderation, which makes the diet highly sustainable long term.
– The diet is rated #2 in best diets from the U.S. News & World Report.

Cons of the Mediterranean diet:
– The Mediterranean diet is a plan, not a structured diet. Eating the Mediterranean way does not promise weight loss, you need to figure out your calorie needs and stick with that if you want to lose weight on this plan.

I do recommend the Mediterranean diet as a healthy, sustainable lifestyle. Here some helpful tips to make it work for you:

– Mediterranean diet recipes, tips, and studies: https://oldwayspt.org/traditional-diets/mediterranean-diet

– Mediterranean diet cookbook: https://www.amazon.com/New-Mediterranean-Diet-Cookbook-Alternative/dp/0553385097

– Consider planning and prepping meals ahead to save time on the Mediterranean diet.

Are you Drinking Enough Water?

By Thad Phillips

With the summer heat upon us we need to pay closer attention to keeping our bodies hydrated. We all know the importance of water but 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated. Below are some signs that you could be dehydrated.

Are you feeling hungry?    

In 37% of Americans, the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is often mistaken for hunger and even mild dehydration will slow down a metabolism as much as 3%. On a side note, one glass of water will shut down midnight hunger pangs for almost 100% of the dieters studied in a University of Washington study.

Are you feeling tired?

Lack of water is the number one trigger of daytime fatigue.

Are you feeling achy?

Research indicates that 8-10 glasses of water a day can significantly ease back and joint pain for 80% of suffers.

Are you having a hard time concentrating?

A mere 2% drop in hydration can trigger fuzzy short-term memory and difficulty in focusing.

Are you feeling weak when you exercise?

At 5% dehydration your strength and endurance decreases significantly.

How much water do we really need?

Women need approximately 91 ounces (3/4 gal) of water daily and men, 125 ounces (1 gal), according to the Institute of Medicine. In addition to drinking water regularly throughout the day, drink about 20 ounces of water leading up to your workout. Then for every 20 minutes you exercise, take in 7 to 10 ounces of fluid.

Resources:
Ericson, J. (2013, July 3). Medical daily 75% of Americans May Suffer From Chronic Dehydration, According to Doctors. Retrieved from http://www.medicaldaily.com/75-americans-may-suffer-chronic-dehydration-according-doctors-247393
The Water Express (2017, January 3). Water Facts. Retrieved from http://www.thewaterexpress.com/Water-Facts-And-Tips.htm
Cespedes, A. (2016, March 13). Livestrong.com Does dehydration slow metabolism Retrieved from http://www.livestrong.com/article/409152-does-dehydration-slow-metabolism/
Stay Healthy (2014, February 11). Why Hydration is important. Retrieved from https://www.stayhealthy.com/en_us/main/hydration_information
Ciese.org (2008). Human need for water. Retrieved from http://www.ciese.org/curriculum/purification/lp_intro.content.html

About the Author:
Thad Phillips is the BaySport Program Director for Apollo Group in Phoenix AZ. For the past 14 years he has served as the Fitness Director at Apollo Group, managing all aspects of the corporate gym, including creating and overseeing incentive programs, writing and monitoring nutritional programs, and conducting individual personal training. Previous experience includes owning a successful personal training studio, as well as working as a Fitness Director for LA Fitness.

Thad’s credentials include ISSA Level II certifications, and his expertise includes fitness, nutritional counseling and training. Thad has provided nutritional counseling and competition diets for bodybuilding, fitness and figure athletes and has also participated in natural bodybuilding competitions over the last 20 years. In 2008 he placed 1st in Class and 1st Overall in the Best of the West competition, which earned him his professional status as a natural bodybuilder. In 2015 he won his class in the highly competitive Mr. Arizona.

Throughout his life, Thad’s dedication and passion has been to help his clients establish fitness goals and to provide them with the knowledge and motivation to achieve those goals and change their lifestyle.